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Edith New in art

Edith New features in the Illustrated Women in History exhibition which is currently on at Central Library, Swindon.  This is a free exhibition and includes work from the curator, Julie Gough, alongside submissions from other artists, all celebrating women’s achievements.  You can also buy a zine which features Edith on the cover – but get in quick as there are limited copies available – http://www.illustratedwomeninhistory.com/

From Illustrated Women in History artist: Julie Gough

The first time we saw Edith depicted in art was when artist Julie featured her in the project ‘Illustrated Women in History’ but we’ve since seen her cropping up in lots of different mediums. 

Art student Stacy Crasto was able to use photographs and letters held by Edith’s great-niece to create her textile art-work below.

Photo of New College art students’ exhibition displayed in the Outlet Village, Swindon September 2016. Artist: Stacy Crasto
Artist: Stacy Crasto
Artist: Stacy Crasto
You can’t see from the photo but this is the text of a letter written by Edith while in prison and is supposed to depict her words trapped behind bars, but still shared. Artist: Stacy Crasto

Swindon Heritage magazine commissioned local artist Lynette Thomas of Artkore Mosaics to create one of her iconic teapots commemorating Edith New.

Teapot commissioned from Artkore Mosaics
Teapot commissioned from Artkore Mosaics

At the Swindon Suffragette Women’s Exhibition and Craft Sale in October 2016 there was a small display of various portraits of Edith created by the United Community Art Group.

Portraits by various members of the United Community Art Group, exhibited October 2016

Back in September 2016 we were very excited when someone posted on our Facebook page that they had just seen some grafitti artists spraying an image that looked a lot like Edith! We were even more pleased to see the finished mural on Cambria Bridge in Swindon.

Edith features in a mural created by Ed Russell and James Habgood of The Visual Drop in collaboration with young people from ‘The Railway Kids’ youth club organised by the Mechanics’ Institution Trust, in partnership with Swindon Borough Council

And finally, on International Women’s Day 2017 we were sent a song about Edith New by local band the Erin Bardwell Collective, have a listen here: https://erinbardwellcollective.bandcamp.com/track/edith-new

Do you have any Edith inspired art you’d like to share with us?  Check back soon for more information about our art exhibition planned for 2018…

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Swindon Suffragette Festival

We are pleased to announce that in June 2018 we will be holding a series of events to celebrate and commemorate the contribution of Swindon Suffragette Edith New, to the campaign for Votes for Women.

February 2018 marks the centenary of the 1918 Representation of the People Act, which gave some women the right to vote although not on an equal footing with men – this came later in 1928.

We will share the full details of all events once they are confirmed but in the meantime, you can add the dates to your diary by checking out our Google calendar: Swindon Suffragette calendar

 

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Suffragette Diary from Clavis and Claustra: http://www.clavisandclaustra.co.uk/suffragette

 

 

On this day 140 years ago…

Edith New was born – Happy Birthday Edith!

We are very fortunate to be able to share some family photos of Edith, before and after her career as a suffragette, these are owned by her great-niece and held in a private collection (copyright applies).

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Edith (left), brother Frederick, mother Isabella (centre), sister Ellen (standing), as yet unidentified young man
Another family photo, Edith is at the front, now wearing her hair up
Edith was a teacher, here she is with her class at St Mary’s School in Lewisham
74 Edith and Nea
Edith and her companion Nea, who she was still living with at her death in 1951
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Edith in Cornwall, she is buried in Polperro where she lived after retiring
Edith (without hat) and friend
Edith (with hat) and friends
Edith (back row)
75 Edith and Nea
Edith (without hat) and Nea
Edith
Edith with her sister Ellen and great-niece Mary

Who was Edith New?

The following is taken from history blog ‘Swindon in the Past Lane’ and reproduced by permission of the author, Frances Bevan, who retains all rights to the text and images as appropriate.

Edith Bessie New was born 17th March, 1877 at 24 North Street, Swindon, the fourth of Frederic and Isabelle New’s five children. Frederic worked as a railway clerk at the GWR Works and Isabelle was a music teacher.

An assistant mistress at Queenstown Infant School from 1899-1901, Edith subsequently left her Swindon home to teach in the deprived areas of Deptford and Lewisham. It was after hearing the charismatic Emmeline Pankhurst speak at a meeting in Trafalgar Square that Edith joined the Women’s Social and Political Union.

In February 1907 a deputation of suffragettes marched on the House of Commons in protest at the omission of votes for women from the King’s speech. What had begun as a peaceful demonstration ended in a violent confrontation with police. Edith was among those arrested and sentenced to two weeks in Holloway gaol.

She continued to be at the forefront of innovative and dangerous protest methods. In January 1908 Edith chained herself to the railings at 10 Downing Street, the first time suffragettes had employed such tactics. It took the unprepared police sometime to release her, allowing Edith to make her protest heard by the assembled Cabinet gathered there. A three-week sentence in Holloway followed.

The hugely successful Women’s Day rally held in Hyde Park on June 21,1908 attracted an estimated crowd of 250,000. Edith, by now an experienced and informative speaker, took her place alongside suffragette leaders.

Later that same month Edith, accompanied by Mary Leigh, broke windows at 10 Downing Street, another new headline grabbing tactic which would be increasingly employed by suffragettes. The women served two months in Holloway. On their release they were taken to a celebratory breakfast party in a carriage drawn by six suffragettes.

Edith resigned from teaching in 1908 to join the WSPU paid workforce. She travelled the country organising support for parliamentary candidates sympathetic to women’s suffrage. In September 1909 she campaigned in Scotland where she was arrested for causing a breach of the peace during a meeting in Dundee. Sentenced to seven days imprisonment, Edith and her fellow prisoners went on hunger strike, the first to do so in Scotland.

Edith returned to teaching in 1911, where she continued to campaign for women’s rights and equal pay within her profession.

Edith died aged 73 on 2nd January 1951 at The Croft, Landaviddy Lane, Polperro, Cornwall. She left property valued at £3,771 to her two nieces.  She never married and her death was registered by her companion of over 40 years, Nea Campion, a fellow teacher from the Lewisham days.

Swindon in the Past Lane – original post